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Predators and Parasitoids of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Eggs

In this context, predation refers to insects or other animals eating the eggs of BMSB before they hatch. Parasitism refers to insects (primarily tiny wasps) laying their eggs inside the eggs of BMSB, thus preventing the BMSB eggs from developing.

In 2013, researchers from eight states (NC, KY, MD, MI, NJ, OH, TN, and WV) surveyed the occurrence of both predation and parasitism of BMSB eggs in a variety of agricultural and non-agricultural (i.e., wooded) settings. In most agricultural settings, predation was much more common than parasitism, resulting in the destruction of up to 35% of the BMSB eggs observed. However, despite the low overall percentage of parasitism observed, there were a few species of parasitic wasps detected in BMSB egg masses in vegetable crops and wooded areas. Telenomus podisi was the most common parasitoid in organic vegetable fields, and Anastatus spp. occurred in high numbers in the few BMSB eggs discovered in wooded areas. Trissolcus spp. was seen emerging from native brown stink bug eggs.

Predators feeding on BMSB eggs:*

soldier beetle larvaSoldier Beetle bigeyed bugBig Eyed Bug insidiousInsidious Flower Bug
argiopeSpiders spined soldier bugSpined soldier bug banded thripsThrips
LB adult 01Coccinelids (“ladybugs”) FL predFlorida predatory stink bug LW larva 06Green and brown lacewings
grasshopper 2Grasshoppers katydidKatydids cricketCrickets

Parasitoids collected from stink bug eggs:

Telenomus podisiTelenomus podisi Anastatus reduviiAnastatus reduvii Anastatus mirabilisAnastatus mirabilis
T edessae (3)-2Trissolcus edessae T euschisti (9)-2Trissolcus euschisti T brochymenae (8)-2Trissolcus brochymenae

*Image credits:
Soldier beetle: Gerald Holmes, Valent USA Corp., Bugwood.org; Bigeyed bug: Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org; Insidious flower bug: John Ruberson, Univ. of Georgia, Bugwood.org; Spined soldier bug: Clemson Univ., USDA Coop. Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org; Thrips: Patrick Marquez, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org; Katydid and cricket: Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org; Florida predatory stink bug: Cyndy Allison; all others: Dylan Tussey and Steve Schoof, NCSU.

Written By

Photo of Stephen SchoofStephen SchoofAgricultural Research Specialist (828) 684-3562 steve_schoof@ncsu.eduEntomology and Plant Pathology - NC State University
Page Last Updated: 4 years ago
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